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5 Ways to Improve Air Quality at Home

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5 Ways to Improve Air Quality at Home

The air we breathe is vital to health in so many ways. Obviously, breathing polluted air can lead to lung disease among other physical complications. A lesser known fact is that air quality can affect us mentally as well. Clean air is linked to increased cognitive function, a better mood, and decreased anxiety. Although we can't escape polluted air completely, we can take these steps to breathe a little cleaner when possible.

Photo: Chris Ford via Flickr

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Air Purifier

Investing in an air purifier is on of the easiest and most obvious ways to reduce harmful airborne particles floating around the home. But remember: not all purifiers are created equal! Stay away from ozone-generating filters which are actually detrimental to health and opt for a HEPA (High Efficiency Particulate Air) filter instead.

Image: US CPSC via Flickr

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Salt Rock Lamps

These lamps are more than just a trendy decoration- they can clean the air just by being lit up. When salt rocks are heated, they emit negative ions into the atmosphere which neutralize air quality. It's recommended to place them near a TV or computer, as they can also eliminate detrimental positive ions from electronics.

Image: Sigusr0 via Flickr

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House Plants

If you're looking for a quick way to make your lungs happy, stock up on some plants. These powerhouses act as natural filters by absorbing VOC's (volatile organic compounds). Then they produce new, clean oxygen through photosynthesis, leaving the air fresh and pure. And if that's not enough, indoor plants are said to boost mood as well!

Image: Thomas Tolkien via Flickr

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Open Windows

Surprisingly, air quality within the home is often worse than it is outdoors. Opening a window, even just for a few minutes per day, can significantly reduce pollution. I recommend keeping several open for cross-ventilation, and get some screens if you're worried about insects getting in!

Image: Francisco Antunes via Flickr

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Dust Regularly

It goes without saying that excess dust is not good for air quality. To prevent buildup, you should be dusting at least weekly- even more if you suffer from asthma or allergies. Countertops and shelves are common culprits, but don't overlook sneakier spots like blinds, furniture, and even pillows.

Also see: Best Natural Allergy Remedies
Green House: How to Build an Indoor Garden

Image: Hans via Pixabay

Quincy Malesovas

Quincy Malesovas

Quincy is an NC-based college student who is passionate about leading a healthy and compassionate life. Aside from classes, she fills her time with cooking, writing, travel, and yoga. You can find more from her on her blog Shugurcän and on Instagram.

Did you know that bad air quality is linked to physical ailments, allergies, even anxiety and depression? 5 Ways to improve air quality.

 

Quincy Malesovas

Quincy Malesovas

Quincy is an NC-based college student who is passionate about leading a healthy and compassionate life. Aside from classes, she fills her time with cooking, writing, travel, and yoga. You can find more from her on her blog Shugurcän and on Instagram.
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